Self Isolation rules

Whilst self isolation continues in the UK, most of us are not regularly driving our cars anywhere as lets face it, there’s nowhere we can go!

It can be easy to feel disconnected from the car – out of sight, out of mind! But that shouldn’t be the case. Your car needs to be driven every two to three weeks to make it less likely that you finish up with a dead battery, flat-spotted tires or other issues that can be caused by letting a car sit parked for weeks.

Many people say they let their cars sit for months in a garage with no problems, but you’re better off driving it a couple of times each month and for at least 10 miles, with some speeds over 50 mph if possible. You not only want your engine to get fully warmed up but for the entire car to get some exercise as well.

Car Battery

Batteries slowly lose their charge when they sit idle, and starting the car will drain it even more. That is one reason you want to drive several miles afterward, so the battery has a chance to recharge. If a car sits parked for a month or more, the battery may lose so much power that it will need a jump-start — or a  charge before the engine will start.

Car Tyres

Tyres slowly lose air under all conditions. As they do, the weight of the car keeps pressing down on the tyres, which causes flat spots to develop on the segments sitting on the ground. Driving the car and adding air if necessary will usually make the tyres round again, but letting the vehicle sit for extended periods on under-inflated tyres can cause permanent flat spots that you will be able to feel and hear when you drive.

Car Engine

Moisture can collect in the gas tank (especially if it isn’t full) and in the oil over time, and that can lead to corrosion.

When the time comes and you’re ready to get out on the roads again, call Barrowford MOT to check over your car to make sure it is safe and roardworthy!

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